John Mclaughlin Jazz Fusion Chromatic guitar alternate picking Lick

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John Mclaughlin Chromatic Guitar alternate picking Jazz Fusion Licks Lesson

This blog takes a brief look at John Mclaughlin’s use of Chromaticism in regards to Jazz Fusion Guitar lines. The 2 licks are also from a video I did on Dave Liebman’s Chromatic approach to jazz. They both share the same concepts. The licks are riffs doubled up with piano.

John Mclaughlin Guitar Lick 1 -Employ strict alternate picking starting on a “Downstroke”

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John Mclaughlin Chromatic Guitar Licks Lesson

John Mclaughlin Guitar Lick 2 -Again, employ strict alternate picking starting on a “Downstroke”

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John Mclaughlin Chromatic Guitar Licks Lesson

The key is to pick each 4 note grouping [Tetrachord] in time with your foot tapping the 1/4 note.

So you have:

“1 e and a 2 e and a 3 e and a 4 e and a”

This will give you a smooth alternate picking sound and hold time with the piano [or doubling instrument].

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How to Read Music rhythms and apply to notation PART 2

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It’s a good idea to watch the video before or along with this blog as it will emphasise many of the key points in this blog.

In the notation diagram below you will see the Whole note called the “Semibreve” this is worth four beats or four 1/4 notes.

How to read music

We will now cut this in half and have two “Minims” or two half notes per semibreve.

How to read music

Now we will have four 1/4 notes called “Crotchets” per Semibreve

How to Read Music

The next rhythmic division is the 1/8th note called a “Quaver”

How to Read Music

They are more commonly grouped and counted like this

How to Read Music

The doubling of the 1/8th note gives us the 16th note called a “Semiquaver”

How to Read Music

Semiquavers [16ths] are more commonly seen and counted like this

How to Read Music
How to Read Music

Lastly we will add “Triplets” to our Basic Rhythms. These are 3 notes played over one 1/4 note beat

How to Read Music

More commonly counted as:

How to Read Music

When setting out to write down music we apply a “Time Signature” in order to acknowledge how many beats there are per bar.

How to Read Music

Here we have “Three” 1/4 note beats per bar

How to Rea Music

Now we have ‘Six Eighth” notes per bar displayed by the 6/8 time signature

How to Read Music

Now let’s apply this to the Scale that we learnt in the previous blog/video “How to read music part 1”

How to Read Music

SYNCOPATION: Syncopated Common Rhythms

Some rhythms are tied as we see below: This makes them syncopated as we start “On” the beat and then accent the “Off-beat”.

How to Read Music

The above rhythm is more commonly written like this:

How to Read Music

SYNCOPATED RHYTHM NUMBER 2:

The other very common syncopated rhythm is this:

How to Read Music

Again, notice the tied notes. This means that the 2nd “On” beat is not played but the “And” Off-Beat is played. It is more commonly written like this:

How to Read Music

Now let’s apply these two common syncopated rhythms to our “Triads” from our previous blog/video lesson on how to read music

The first Rhythm with triad melody:

How to Read Music

The second Rhythm with triad melody:

How to Read Music

Okay, that’s the end of part 2 on “How to Read Music Rhythms and Notation”.

If you found this useful then it is a good idea to look at “How to Read Music” part 1 Blog and Video.[ Also, the Video is on Youtube and it covers the Scale/Triads notation].

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ii V7 I in ALL 12 KEYS jazz improvising Jam/Backing Track.

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ii V7 I in ALL 12 KEYS jazz improvising Jam/Backing Track.

Below is the ii V7 I cadences, chord chart for jazz/fusion improvisation practice in “All 12 Keys”

ii V7 I in ALL 12 KEYS jazz improvisation chart

Here is another variation to practice the ii V7 I’s in all 12 keys for improvisation practice.

Notice the two changes from the predictable pattern when playing through the chart.

ii V7 I in ALL 12 KEYS jazz improvisation chart

Backing Track for this ii V7 I chart in the video below

ii V7 I in ALL 12 KEYS jazz improvising Jam/Backing Track.

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